Learning old lessons

This is, according to my new blog dashboard, the 1000th post on this blog.  I’m slowly going through the process of re-titling all my posts and retagging everything, because when I exported all the information from Xanga, those two things were lost in the process.  Xanga’s tagging system was particularly idiotic, so it is a nice change to have a much more sophisticated way of dealing with old posts.  I’m only back to early 2008, when I was living in the metropolis of Gambier, Ohio, and in the process of reading through old posts, I am relearning old lessons.  For example, I actually did a video on how to wrap a puerh cake, which some of you may find useful.  There were old experiments I ran with different kinds of water, which echoes a recent post on the relatively new blog Listening to Leaves.  I am also reminded of how my young puerh pot used to look like, and old lessons playing with toys that I don’t own.  Most importantly, memories of meetings I’ve had with friends, and teas on important occasions.

I am hoping that I’ll get this whole re-tagging business done before long, so it’ll be easier to refer to older things, which are probably not too useful for anyone else, but reading them again reminds me of things I learned over time.  Keeping a blog has helped me with organizing my own thoughts about tea, and of course, preserving a record of it.  Some people (Hobbes, for example) keep a physical record of it too.  Either way, I think it is probably the best tea-related decision I’ve ever taken.  If you don’t keep a record of your tea drinking, you should.  It will make you a better tea drinker.


Comments

Learning old lessons — 4 Comments

  1. Congratulations on such a long-kept and illustrious blog. I guess I’ll step up to the plate and claim the distinction of being the first commenter for the 1000th post! Fun to read a bit about your memories and musings (and with links, thereby saving me some digging for them!). The water experiments post you wrote was amazing. I’m humbled 🙂 I had noticed the Fiji water contained a certain amount of minerals (ppm) but after reading your post I’m all inspired now to follow that further. I particularly like your thoughts about using more filtered water to play up the hallmarks of green teas.

    • The water thing was done a long time ago — sometime in 2007. The new Tibetan water came on the market and I just HAD to try it out. It was a great learning experience.

      I’d say experiment with water, because that’s a much cheaper way of improving your tea when compared with buying better leaves.

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