Drinking cold tea

It’s funny sometimes when you drink a cup of half cold tea, and notice something that’s entirely different from the cup of hot tea you had a few minutes ago. Sure, one infusion apart, but I think in such cases, much can be chalked up to the temperature of the tea (and what that means for your tongue) rather than the actual tea changing.

I was drinking my biyuzhu today, and one cup, when drunk almost cold, tasted somewhere between a hongcha and an odd green tea. It’s a strange combination of tastes, and certainly not something that I would find if I had drank that cup hot.

I know people who, when drinking old puerh, will drink half a cup hot, and then let the other half cool down a bit and drink that. YP, among others, does that sometimes. It enhances certain aspect of the tea and can actually make you more aware of the aromatics of a certain tea. When it’s too hot, many such things go unnoticed. It’s the same thing as when one drinks a cup of iced tea (no dilution — only fridge treatment) versus a cup of the hot thing at the same strength, only this way it’s a little more subtle.

Yes, throw in yet one more variable to the never ending series of things you have to look out for when you brew tea.


Comments

Drinking cold tea — 1 Comment

  1. Temperature is definitely a huge variable. I do almost all my tastings at whatever temperature it is when I can comfortably hold the cup. If it’s too hot to hold, It’s too hot to drink.

    The flavor that lends itself to the temperature change most is bitterness. If I get a tea that bitters up quicker than most, and can taste that in the “hot” phase, I make sure to gulp it down. Because the bitterness only becomes more pronounced as the temperature cools.

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