Tea everywhere

Let’s see, how many teas have I had today?

I had my first tea after lunch. It was one of the samples that Mr. Lochan sent me, one of the Darjeeling oolongs. I don’t want to say much about it yet, as I think I brewed it under sub-optimal condition, and also because it’s the first time I’m trying it. It’s a new genre, I’d say, so I think I need to try it a few times before I know how to brew it properly and form a concrete opinion on it. It’s strong in some places, and weak in others.

Then, I went out to see a movie. After that… it was dinner with my cousin, where we ate at a very old Hong Kong restaurant (since 1860) serving HK style western food (they’re famous for their Swiss chicken wings). They pour you regular “tea” for drink (think of the role of iced water in Western restaurants, but substitute it with hot tea). The tea is a watered down version of the traditional Hong Kong milk tea (but without the milk). Then, to finish off dinner, we both had a cup of milk tea, but neither of us added milk. It was strong, bitter, sour, full bodied, but VERY smooth. This is stuff that is boiled in stockings. From what I know, it is a mix of a blend of Indian tea plus some puerh to give it a sweet edge. It’s a very unique taste that is not replicated anywhere else other than Hong Kong style restaurants everywhere in the world. This particular blend tasted a bit coffee-ish, given its harshness. Best with milk, but I was bad today :p

Then…. I picked up my mom from her dinner with her friends, and there, I had some watered down biluochun. I think it was biluochun anyway. It was pretty watered down and I could only get a hint of the taste.

Tea everywhere, as you can see. Caffeine intake here is quite high in the course of a normal day, so I really need to watch myself when drinking tea at teahouses, because otherwise…..


Comments

Tea everywhere — 2 Comments

  1. All right, tea everywhere!!

    The last time I was at ̫ƽÅo, I think they served both HK-style milk tea and regular (or “Ceylon” ) tea, which came with milk on the side. I remember ordering the HK-style and it wasn’t as good as those from the tea-stalls (²è™n). I suspect they didn’t have a separate pot of HK-style tea as they should; instead, they used the regular tea and added evaporated milk to make it “HK-style,” which of course would be all wrong. I should have done what you did.

    Will you be going to Lin Heng Teahouse  (ɏÏã)? For some reason, I really really enjoy the Puerh there. Do you like it too?

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.